Dec 082015
 

2000-chrysler-lhs
My 2000 Chrysler LHS is giving us an intermittent start failure. Sometimes a partial engine turnover but mostly no click, no partial engine turnover, nothing. I put it on the battery charger. It drew more amps than I thought it should. Engine wouldn’t start even using the “Engine Start” feature on the charger. After two hours of what I thought was excessive charge it still wouldn’t start. I gave up and called the repair shop. They came the next day and it started right up. It’s a new battery by the way. ?!?!?

  One Response to “2000 Chrysler LHS”

  1. Quick fix:
    Replace the starter and the starter relay, confirm clean snug battery connections.

    Have plenty of time:
    Next time it will not start you will need to check for battery voltage at the “S” terminal on the starter while someone holds the ignition key in the “START” position. If you see battery voltage, Replace the starter. If there is no power you will need to trace the wiring to see where you have lost battery voltage. It would be the wiring, the gear selector switch or the starter relay. The most common being the relay. Test and replace as needed.

    Starter Relay:
    The relay is located in the Power Distribution Center (PDC). Refer to the PDC cover for relay location.

    How to replace the Starter:
    To Remove:
    1.Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions in the vehicles owners manual.
    2.Disconnect battery negative remote cable from remote ground post.
    3.Raise and safely support the vehicle.
    2000 chrysler LHS starter
    4.Remove or disconnect the following: ◦Three bolts attaching starter to engine
    ◦Positive battery cable from starter
    ◦Starter assembly from transmission housing

    5.Position jack stand beneath engine and slightly lift to relieve pressure from left engine mount.
    6.Remove three left engine mount bolts from engine block.
    7.Jack engine up slightly to give more room to maneuver starter assembly.
    8.Slide rear of starter motor out between catalytic converter and engine mount.
    9.Remove or disconnect the following: ◦Posi-lock starter solenoid connector.
    ◦Starter from vehicle.

    To Install:
    1.Install or connect the following: ◦Positive battery cable to starter
    ◦Posi-lock starter solenoid connector

    2.Jack engine up slightly to give more room to maneuver starter assembly.
    3.Install or connect the following: ◦Starter A.Torque to 40 ft. lbs. (54 Nm)

    ◦Three left engine mount mounting bolts to engine block

    4.Lower vehicle.
    5.Connect the battery negative cable.
    ———————————————————————————

    Labor time to replace starter:
    1.0 Hours

    Labor time to replace starter relay:
    0.3 hours

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    Reference:

    Starting System Voltage Drop Tests

    NOTE: The battery must be in good condition and fully charged prior to performing this test.

    There are three area of the starter motor circuits that voltage drop test can be performed on. These include:
    •The starter feed circuit
    •The starter ground circuit
    •The starter solenoid.

    Starter Feed Circuit
    1.Disable the fuel system by removing the fuel pump fuse or the fuel pump relay.
    2.Verify that the vehicle will not start.
    3.Connect the positive lead of a voltmeter to the positive terminal of the battery.
    4.Connect the negative lead of a voltmeter to the starter B+ terminal.
    5.Turn the ignition key to the START position and note the voltage displayed on the voltmeter. ◦Ideally, there should be no more than 0.1 volt drop for each connection displayed on the voltmeter. No voltage should be consumed by the vehicle wiring A.If the battery cable connects directly to the starter motor there should be no more than a 0.2 volt drop measured
    B.If the vehicle uses a starter solenoid between the battery and the starter motor terminal there should be no more than 0.4 volt displayed on the voltmeter

    Starter Ground Circuit
    1.Disable the fuel system by removing the fuel pump fuse or the fuel pump relay.
    2.Verify that the vehicle will not start.
    3.Connect the positive lead of the voltmeter to the case of the starter motor.
    4.Connect the negative lead of the voltmeter to the negative terminal of the battery.
    5.Turn the ignition key to the START position and note the voltage displayed on the voltmeter. ◦Ideally, there should be no more than 0.1 volt drop for each connection displayed on the voltmeter. No voltage should be consumed by the vehicle wiring A.If the battery cable connects directly to the starter motor there should be no more than a 0.2 volt drop measured.

    Starter Solenoid
    1.Disable the fuel system by removing the fuel pump fuse or the fuel pump relay.
    2.Verify that the vehicle will not start.
    3.Connect the positive lead of the voltmeter to the case starter B+ terminal.
    4.Connect the negative lead of the voltmeter to the lug (the starter M terminal) that connects the starter solenoid to the starter motor.
    5.Turn the ignition key to the START position and note the voltage displayed on the voltmeter. ◦Ideally, there should be no more than 0.2 volt drop across the starter solenoid displayed on the voltmeter.

    In general, there should be no more than a 1.0 volt drop throughout the entire starter motor feed and ground circuit. Any voltage drops measured in either the feed or ground circuits after connections have been cleaned will require replacement of the affected battery cable. Typically, any voltage drops measured in the solenoid are repaired by replacing the starter motor.

    ————————————————————
    How the Starting System Works on a 2000 Chrysler LHS 3.5L engine:
    The starting system includes the battery, starter motor and solenoid, ignition switch, circuit protection and wiring connecting all of the components. An inhibitor switch located in the Transmission Range (TR) sensor is included in the starting system to prevent the vehicle from being started unless the transmission is in PARK. A similar function is performed by the clutch switch in manual transmission vehicles.

    When the ignition key is turned to the START position, current flows and energizes the starter’s solenoid coil. The solenoid plunger and clutch shift lever are activated and the clutch pinion engages the ring gear on the flywheel. The switch contacts close, and the starter cranks the engine until the engine starts.

    To prevent damage caused by excessive starter armature rotation when the engine starts, the starter incorporates an over-running clutch in the pinion gear. This disengages the starter motor from the engine when the engine begins to run on its own.

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