Jan 022017
 

2001 Dodge Ram 1500Some one attempted to steal it. So the ignition switch and cylinder is torn up
I was wondering if universal parts will work.


RESPONSE

I do not see any reason you shouldn’t be able to.

RKE/VTSS

Only the highline and premium CTMs have provision for RKE and VTSS. The VTSS system monitors the jamb switches and ignition switch to detect unauthorized entry. Once the system is armed, any one of these inputs can cause the system to initiate an alarm. When in alarm, the low beam headlamps and horn will pulse for about three minutes. If the engine is started, it will immediately stall. If the triggering condition remains, the headlamps will pulse for an additional 15 minutes, but the engine cannot be made to run until the system is disarmed. If the triggering condition is restored, the system will reset and return to the armed state. If the system has rearmed itself, it will sound three horn chirps as a tamper alert when the system is disarmed. The CTM will store the last four causes of a VTSS alarm. The causes can be retrieved by the DRBIII®.

The VTSS system can be disarmed by unlocking the doors with the RKE transmitter or with a door key at either door.

A VTSS indicator in the overhead console will blink rapidly during system arming, slowly when armed and remain on to indicate a system fault.

The RKE system is programmed by the DRBIII®. The system will store up to four key fob codes. Using the DRBIII®, it is possible to program one code without deleting the others. All stored key fob codes can be erased and reprogrammed to prevent unauthorized entry with lost or stolen key fobs.

Starting System Operation

The starting system components form two separate circuits. A high-amperage feed circuit that feeds the starter motor between 150 and 350 amperes (700 amperes – diesel engine), and a low-amperage control circuit that operates on less than 20 amperes. The high-amperage feed circuit components include the battery, the battery cables, the contact disc portion of the starter solenoid, and the starter motor. The low-amperage control circuit components include the ignition switch, the clutch pedal position switch (manual transmission), the park/neutral position switch (automatic transmission), the starter relay, the electromagnetic windings of the starter solenoid, and the connecting wire harness components.

If the vehicle is equipped with a manual transmission, it has a clutch pedal position switch installed in series between the ignition switch and the coil battery terminal of the starter relay. This normally open switch prevents the starter relay from being energized when the ignition switch is turned to the momentary Start position, unless the clutch pedal is depressed. This feature prevents starter motor operation while the clutch disc and the flywheel are engaged. The starter relay coil ground terminal is always grounded on vehicles with a manual transmission.

If the vehicle is equipped with an automatic transmission, battery voltage is supplied through the low-amperage control circuit to the coil battery terminal of the starter relay when the ignition switch is turned to the momentary Start position. The park/neutral position switch is installed in series between the starter relay coil ground terminal and ground. This normally open switch prevents the starter relay from being energized and the starter motor from operating unless the automatic transmission gear selector is in the Neutral or Park positions.

When the starter relay coil is energized, the normally open relay contacts close. The relay contacts connect the relay common feed terminal to the relay normally open terminal. The closed relay contacts energize the starter solenoid coil windings.

The energized solenoid pull-in coil pulls in the solenoid plunger. The solenoid plunger pulls the shift lever in the starter motor. This engages the starter overrunning clutch and pinion gear with the starter ring gear on the manual transmission flywheel or on the automatic transmission torque converter or torque converter drive plate.

As the solenoid plunger reaches the end of its travel, the solenoid contact disc completes the high-amperage starter feed circuit and energizes the solenoid plunger hold-in coil. Current now flows between the solenoid battery terminal and the starter motor, energizing the starter.

Once the engine starts, the overrunning clutch protects the starter motor from damage by allowing the starter pinion gear to spin faster than the pinion shaft. When the driver releases the ignition switch to the On position, the starter relay coil is de-energized. This causes the relay contacts to open. When the relay contacts open, the starter solenoid plunger hold-in coil is de-energized.

When the solenoid plunger hold-in coil is de-energized, the solenoid plunger return spring returns the plunger to its relaxed position. This causes the contact disc to open the starter feed circuit, and the shift lever to disengage the overrunning clutch and pinion gear from the starter ring gear.

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